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How The Introduction of Player Trades Revolutionizes The Oceanic Esports Dota League Season 2

We’ve heard the news: the hottest esports league primarily dedicated to grooming Australia-New Zealand’s potential-filled Dota 2 scene returns for a second season. Back with it are 70 players guided by 10 experienced captains, who have all embarked on an esports journey anew to claim the coveted Oceanic Esports League championship title.

Maouie Reyes
Freelance Esports Writer
25th Aug, 2020·☕️ 3 min read
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We’ve heard the news: the hottest esports league primarily dedicated to grooming Australia-New Zealand’s potential-filled Dota 2 scene returns for a second season. Back with it are 70 players guided by 10 experienced captains, who have all embarked on an esports journey anew to claim the coveted Oceanic Esports League championship title.

This season, aside from the fact that the internationally-recognized Australian Dota 2 star Damien “kpii” Chok have joined the league as a coach for the Loseyourself-led Cuteanimegirls squad, another thing that makes the Oceanic Esports Dota League revolutionary this time is the introduction of player trades.

Starting from the fifth week until the seventh group stage week, all team captains will be given a maximum of two trade allowances which they can use to execute a one-for-one player swap. Player trades may only occur during the allocated trade window and all participating players are only allowed to be traded once during the course of the season.

Moreover, undrafted players who were not initially picked during the pre-season player draft will also be eligible for selection during the trade window. Undrafted players may be able to be selected once, while a player who has been traded into the undrafted pool will be eligible to be selected by any other team with a trade slot available. All trades that will occur during the allotted window will be subject for approval or denial by the Oceanic Esports Dota League administration.

Mid-season trade is a common practice in traditional sports. For fans, it’s a sought-after event for its potential to alter on-going storylines. An addition of a rising star to one’s favorite, yet struggling, team gives extra hope of clinching a playoff spot. For players, on the other hand, it’s an opportunity to fix what they have found to seem broken during the first half of the season. Capable contenders can immediately turn into a legitimate threat just by recruiting a perfect role player.

In the NBA for example, one of the most impactful mid-season trades ever recorded happened in 2004. At the trade deadline, Detroit Pistons acquired Rasheed Wallace to complete their no-star roster that was led by Chauncey Billups, Richard Hamilton, Tayshaun Prince, and Ben Wallace. The Pistons, which back then were in a 14-year title drought, proceeded to win the finals, 4-1, against the Los Angeles Lakers that had the Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal tandem.

If we’re going to hit closer to home, there’s no better narrative to offer other than OG’s last-minute acquisition of Topson to complete their roster for The International 2018. A relatively unknown pub stomper from Europe whose first LAN appearance was already at the grandest Dota 2 stage, Topson evolved from a nobody to a midlane genius. No one can objectively downplay his contributions to OG’s historic back-to-back Aegis of Champions run.

From a certain perspective, the implementation of player trade suffices the absence of patches. Major patches are known to alter the tide of competitive play as its nerfs on certain heroes, items, or strategies, affect teams and players who have become largely dominant because of the existing meta. Player trades, on the other hand, provide the same concept of much-needed change albeit less drastic.

Last season, we were all witnesses to Flash Point Gaming’s dominance. From day one up to the final head-to-head against SADBOYS.AU, Kouros1ve and the boys proved the league’s inaugural championship title belongs only to them. Now imagine if the player trade system existed back then. Sure, chances are Flash Point Gaming won’t spend any of their trade allowances because they won’t fix what’s not broken, but it would definitely change the situation for their competitors.

The implementation of player trade into the second season of the Oceanic Esports Dota League will ultimately promote a fiercer state competition. It will hamper the outright dominance of a participant not by directly crippling it, but by strengthening the level of its competitors. It will also give recognition to players as it will eventually highlight one’s impact upon leaving or joining a team.

Overall, the player trade complements the main purpose that the Oceanic Esports Dota League: provide the Australia-New Zealand competitive gamers and viewers the best experience ever.


Catch Oceania’s finest Dota 2 players in action at the Oceanic Esports Dota League Season 2 live on Twitch from Wednesday to Saturday!

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